Published Works

Selected Refereed Journal Articles & Book Chapters

  • “Issues in hostage / crisis negotiation, in Communication in Forensic Contexts: Integrated Approaches from Psychology, Linguistics and Law Enforcement. New York, New York: Wiley & Sons., (invited co-author – expected 2015).
  • “Research skills for police officers in a counter-terrorism policing context, in Language in uniform: Language analysis and training for defence and policing purposes. Newcastle-upon-Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing Ltd., (invited author – expected 2014).
  • “Multimodal Synergy: Exploring intersemiotic complementarity in page-based advertisements”, in Handbuch Sprache im Multimodalen Kontext“ (Handbook of Language and Multimodality), Nina-Maria Klug & Hartmut Stöckl, Berlin/Boston: De Gruyter, for the Sprachwissen“ (‘knowledge of/about language’) Series, (expected 2014).
  • “Serving a high-risk warrant: the role of context in police crisis negotiations”, in Language and crisis, Mohd Don, Z. & A. De Rycker, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, for ‘Discourse Approaches to Politics, Society and Culture’ Series, 2013 pp. 101-129.
  • “Research literacies for researchers: conceptualising the literature review”, International Symposium on Language, Linguistics, Literature and Education 2013 (ISLLLE 2013), Osaka, Japan, Conference Proceedings, November 8, 2013. pp. 101-129. (CD Proceedings ISBN: 978-986-89844-7-9)
  • “The Analysis of Police Crisis Negotiations: Important Interactional Features”, International Journal of Law, Language and Discourse (IJLLD), Vol.2:3, 2012,pp.1-24.
  • “The Routledge Handbook of Forensic Linguistics”, by M. Coulthard & A. Johnson, Routledge: Taylor and Francis Group, 2010, Australian Review of Applied Linguistics, Vol.34:4, 2011, pp108-111. Book review.
  • “The Negotiator and the Bomber: An interactive analysis of the critical role of active listening in crisis negotiations”, originally published by Negotiation Journal Volume 21, No 1, January 2005, pp.5-27. Translated into Japanese by Shigeko Ishikawa for ‘Shonan Eibungaku’ (Shonan English Literature Journal), No. 5, August 2010,Nihon University, Tokyo, Japan, pp.44-73.
  • Critical Incidents: Staging and process in crisis negotiations, Journal of Policing, Intelligence and Counter Terrorism Vol. 4, No 2, November 2009, pp.25-40.
  • “Intersemiotic Complementarity: A framework for multimodal discourse analysis”, in Royce, T. & W. Bowcher, New Directions in the Analysis of Multimodal Discourse, New York: Routledge, 2007, pp. 63-109.
  • “Analysing Multimodal Intertextuality: An illustrative analysis, in Multimodality: Towards the most efficient communication by humans”, Graduate School of Letters: Nagoya University. 2006 pp. 101-114.
  • “Intersemiotic Complementarity in Multimodal Text: An analytical framework”, in Creation and practical use of language texts. Graduate School of Letters: Nagoya University. 2003 pp. 99-109.
  • “The Negotiator and the Bomber: Analysing the critical role of active listening in crisis negotiations”, Negotiation Journal, Vol. 21, No 1, January 2005, pp.5-27.
  • “Multimodality in the TESOL Classroom: Exploring visual-verbal synergy”, TESOL Quarterly Vol. 36, No. 2 Summer 2002, pp191-205.
  • “Developing Visual Literacy for the 21st Century”, The Language Teacher Volume 26, No. 7, July 2002, pp23-25.

Books and Selected Articles

The Negotiator and the Bomber: An interactive analysis of the critical role of active listening in crisis negotiations

Abstract: This article extends Michael R. Hammer and Randall G. Rogan’s communication-based, interactive model of crisis negotiation by examining the role of active listening by a police negotiator in New South Wales, Australia in the process of serving a “high-risk warrant” on an armed and dangerous man who was expected to resist. Through an analysis of the interaction between the perpetrator and the negotiator, this paper demonstrates that the use of active listening in the early stages of the negotiation was a critical factor in the resolution of this crisis and is an essential skill for any hostage negotiator.

The Negotiation Journal (Program on Negotiation: Harvard Law School)

Critical Incidents: Staging and process in crisis negotiations

Abstract: Much of the literature on using communication skills in negotiations in critical incidents focuses primarily on analyses at the word, clause, or sentence level (or micro level), and typically classifies, labels, and interprets these in terms of sets of active listening skills (mirroring, emotion labeling, paraphrasing, etc.), or suggested example phrases that negotiators need to draw upon for rapport-building during an incident. The analysis presented in this paper attempts to move away from this micro level focus by analysing the stages and processes of a critical incident from a macro or discourse view. It is proposed that an analysis of the ways that the interaction between the police negotiator and the person of interest (POI) moves through various stages, and cycles through various interactive processes, can be revealing in terms of the critical moments when these occur, and in explicating the ways that critical incidents can unfold.

Journal of Policing, Intelligence and Counter Terrorism (JPICT)

The Analysis of Police Crisis Negotiations: Important Interactional Features

Abstract: In recent years understandings of the interactional features of police crisis negotiations have developed through approaches which have built on and developed the precursor bargaining and expressive models of crisis negotiations. This paper draws upon this more interactional interpretation of police crisis negotiations by highlighting and discussing their main features: the use of active listening to build rapport with a person of interest (POI), the discourse staging of the negotiation (critical moments), and the role that features of the context before and during the incident can play in the language choices made by the negotiator in interaction with the POI. These interactional features are illustrated via extracts from a police crisis negotiation in Australia, and suggestions for further research are provided.

International Journal of Law, Language and Discourse (IJLLD)

Serving a high-risk warrant: the role of context in police crisis negotiations

Dr. Royce has a chapter in the edited volume: Discourse and Crisis: Critical perspectives. This book brings together an exciting collection of studies into crisis as text and context, as unfolding process and unresolved problem. Crisis is viewed as a complex phenomenon that – in its prevalence, disruptiveness and (appearance of) inevitability – is both socially produced and discursively constituted.

Discourse Approaches to Politics, Society and Culture’ Series: John Benjamins Publishing Company

The Routledge Handbook of Forensic Linguistics 2010

The book deals with the most recent and prominent discussions, debates, topics, research approaches and methodologies utilized in Forensic Linguistics. It provides a broad introduction to the field, and a compilation of thirty-seven original chapters by contributors from a wide range of professions and a range of different countries. It is a comprehensive work of reference which aims to be “a comprehensive advanced introduction to core issues and topics in contemporary forensic linguistics”, as well as a specific resource for undergraduates or postgraduates new to the area.

Book review by Dr Royce in the Australian Review of Applied Linguistics (ARAL)

New Directions in the Analysis of Multimodal Discourse

This volume addresses multimodality from both theoretical and practical perspectives, and indicates new directions in research and application. It explores and accounts for the various facets of multimodality in a range of texts and contexts by renowned researchers, and provides a variety of new and novel approaches in developing multimodal discourse analysis.
Dr. Royce has two chapters in this volume:
Ch 2: Intersemiotic Complementarity: A framework for multimodal discourse analysis.
Ch 12: Multimodal Communicative Competence in second Language Contexts.

Edited volume by T Royce & W Bowcher, 2007, New York: Routledge